disabilities, Multiple Sclerosis, Uncategorized

MS World celebrates 20 years

https://vimeo.com/173194278   Help us celebrate MS WOrld’s 20th anniversary, the site was started in Eugene Oregon twenty years ago. Watch this video showing the faces of MS World. And while there check out the site, and read the message boards where people with MS ask questions and get answers from other people who are going through what they are.

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disability, Multiple Sclerosis, Uncategorized, Writing

MS can turn out to be a good thing.

Read this great blog about finding out you have MS

http://www.msconnection.org/Blog/May-2016/Dear-Cat?saved=1

Your essay really hit home for me, as it expressed exactly how i felt waiting for the dr to tell me the news. As i was walking into the doctors, there was a long hall to get to his door and i thought to myself, “when i walk out this door my life will be changed forever” and it did. But like you said, it doesn’t define me, thinking the worst is only a first response, since i had progressive kind i thought my life was over. After the initial shock of it all, was over, i developed into a calm state where i began the first day of the rest of my life. My MS stabilized and hasn’t progressed in 10 years, . One day when i was cleaning out my closets, i found my journals from the early days when i first moved to Oregon, when i worked as a timber inventory forester in the Wallowa Mts in eastern OR. As i read them, i started to chuckle and thought, these would make a good book, so i wrote three fictionalized memoirs, i never would have found the time to write, if it wasn’t because of MS. I worked 35 years in service to people with disabilities, who better to know, life can be just as good even if you use a walker or are in a wheelchair. My profession taught me how to access grants, durable medical equipment so i knew the ropes. So without MS i never would have published my three books. “The Eve Chronicles” by Diane DeVillers, check it out on amazon. Life changes, we adapt, and then finally we accept. Your story transported me back to the early days when i found out that yes MS can be a monster, but i am no longer afraid of my dragon, who waits for me, who someday will consume me, but i fight it, i do my best to adapt and move forward to what ever my path will be.

 

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Uncategorized

Baby boomers with Autism are retiring

Supporting The Age Wave: Baby Boomers and Autism

Since 2010, baby boomers in the United States have been turning 65 at the rate of approximately 10,000 a day. Some of these new baby boomers are people with autism. At the same time, over 3.5 million adults with autism and other developmental disabilities are living with family members. In nearly 25 percent of these households, the family caregivers are over 60 years of age. During Autism Acceptance month, we should address the challenges that the age wave creates for people with autism and their family members.

To start, people with autism over the age of 65 should learn about benefits that may be available to them in the disability and aging service systems. Learn about what public benefits the person with autism may be eligible for and apply for the appropriate benefits. In addition, Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) can help you access services and support available to seniors. AAAs offer a variety of home and community-based services such as respite, meals on wheels, and transportation. Visit www.ncoa.org for more information about additional benefits available to seniors.

Supporting aging parents of people with autism is another critical issue that needs to be addressed. In addition to the health and financial issues that all seniors face, caregivers are often overwhelmed by concern about what the future will look like for their son or daughter once they can no longer provide support. Although planning for the future can be challenging and emotional, it is necessary and possible.

Discussing these major life transitions and putting a plan in place may actually alleviate some of the stress experienced by adults with autism, their caregivers, and other family members. The Arc’s Center for Future Planning offers information and resources to adults with I/DD, aging caregivers, and other family members.

During Autism Acceptance Month, here are some ways you can access more help:

SL371155 (1)

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